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CfP and Workshops: IFIP Summer School on Privacy and Identity Management 20.-24. August

10.05.2018

Die 13. Internationale IFIP Summer School on Privacy and Identity Management mit dem diesjährigen Fokus auf "Fairness, accountability and transparency in the age of big data" findet zwischen dem 20-24 August 2018 in Wien statt. Gastgeber ist das AIT Austrian Institute of Technology.

IFIP Summer School on Privacy and Identity Management

August 20-24, 2018
AIT Austrian Institute of Technology
Vienna, Austria

Holistic approach and interdisciplinarity

The IFIP Summer Schools take a holistic approach to society and technology and support interdisciplinary exchange through keynote and plenary lectures, tutorials, workshops, and research paper presentations. In particular, participants’ contributions that combine technical, legal, regulatory, socio-economic, social or societal, political, ethical, anthropological, philosophical, or psychological perspectives are welcome. The interdisciplinary character of the work is fundamental to the School.

Workshops and scientific papers

The research paper presentations and the workshops have a particular focus on involving students, and on encouraging the publication of high-quality, thorough research papers by students/young researchers.

Best paper award and Springer

To this end, the School has a three-phase review process for submitted papers. In the first phase submitted papers are reviewed and selected for presentation at the School. After the School, these papers are revised to benefit from the discussion that occurred at the School, and are then reviewed again for inclusion in the School’s proceedings which will be published by Springer. Every year an award is given for the Best Student Paper. Submissions by senior researchers and participants in European, national, or regional/community research projects are also very welcome, and are generally published in a separate section of the book volume.

Submissions

Extended abstracts (2-4 pages) should be submitted via the Easychair System: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ifipsc2018 

Program

The program will be updated continuously as soon as speakers confirm, and as soon as the program committee has made program decisions. Thank you for your patience.


Organisation


General Co-Chairs:
Stephan Krenn (AIT Austrian Institute of Technology), TBA

Programme Committee Co-Chairs:
Eleni Kosta (Tilburg University), Jo Pierson (Vrije Universiteit Brussel), Daniel Slamanig (AIT Austrian Institute of Technology)

IFIP Summer School Steering Committee:
Jan Camenisch (IBM Research – Zürich), Marit Hansen (ULD), Ronald Leenes (Tilburg University), Simone Fischer-Hübner (Karlstad University), Diane Whitehouse (The Castlegate Consultancy), Charles Raab (University of Edinburgh), Anja Lehmann (IBM Research – Zürich), Ignacio Sanchez (JRC)

Local Event Chair: TBA

Programme Committee:  TBA


Call for papers


Call for submissions

The Summer School takes a holistic approach to society and technology and supports interdisciplinary exchange through keynote and plenary lectures, tutorials, workshops, and research paper presentations. In particular, participants’ contributions that combine technical, legal, regulatory, socio-economic, social or societal, political, ethical, anthropological, philosophical, historical, or psychological perspectives are welcome. The interdisciplinary character of the work is fundamental to the School.

The research paper presentations and the workshops focus on involving students, and on encouraging the publication of high-quality, thorough, research papers by students/young researchers. To this end, the School has a three-phase review process for submitted papers. In the first phase, submissions are short abstracts . Submissions within the scope of the call are selected for presentation at the School. For accepted submissions, the full papers of up to 16 pages in length in Springer LNCS format are to be submitted before the Summer School takes place and they appear in the (unreviewed) pre-proceedings. In a second review phase, the full papers are reviewed soon after the Summer School. The students are invited to resubmit their full papers, after they have revised them based on two sets of feedback: the discussions that took place at the Summer School, as well as a formal written review by programme committee members. In the third review phase, after the full papers are resubmitted, they are reviewed again for inclusion in the School’s proceedings, which will be published by Springer.

Submissions by senior researchers and participants in European, national, or regional/community research projects are also very welcome, and are generally published in a separate section of the book volume.

Call for Tutorials and Workshops

The School also welcomes contributions in the form of tutorials and workshop proposals from all disciplines (e.g. computer science, economics, ethics, law, psychology, sociology, history, political and other social sciences, surveillance studies, business and public management). The timelines for submission of these tutorials and workshops are the same as those of the student papers. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: concepts, technologies and applications, design, enforcement mechanisms, effects, attitudes, and user practices.

Tutorials are expected to last one or two hours. Proposals should contain a short summary and state the level and background required for attendees to follow the tutorial.

Workshops are expected to last one or two hours and must generate short papers that recapitulate the outcome and the kinds of discussions raised in the School, for inclusion in the post-proceedings. Proposals should contain a short statement summarising the topic(s) to be discussed and the expected contributions from the audience members e.g. responding to a questionnaire or conducting a small experiment. Proposers should indicate whether any special equipment is needed for the workshop, such as audiovisual systems or computational equipment and support.

How to submit

Extended abstracts (2-4 pages) must be made in PDF format, in the Springer LNCS template (https://www.springer.com/computer/lncs?SGWID=0-164-6-793341-0), and using the Easychair System: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ifipsc2018


Deadlines

Extended abstract (2-4 pages) submission, workshop & tutorial proposals 10 May 2018

Notification of acceptance for presentation at the school: 20 May 2018

Full papers for pre-proceedings: 8 August 2018

Presentation at Summer School, feedback from participants: 20-24 August 2018

First feedback review to the authors: 20 September 2018

Paper submission for Springer proceedings: 10 November 2018

Notification to the authors: 10 December 2018

Camera-ready copy for proceedings: 10 January 2019

Background and Vision


Background and goals

We are inviting contributions to this Summer School from students who are at the stage of preparing a master or a PhD thesis as well as young researchers and practitioners. The school is interactive in character, and is composed of plenary lectures and workshops based around Master/PhD students’ presentations. The principle is to encourage young academic and industry entrants to the privacy and identity management world to share their own ideas, build up a collegial relationship with others, gain experience in making presentations, and potentially publish a paper through the resulting book proceedings.

This Summer School is a joint effort between the IFIP Working Groups 9.2, 9.6/11.7, 11.6, and Special Interest Group 9.2.2 and different European and national research projects. The 2017 IFIP Summer School will bring together junior and senior researchers and practitioners from multiple disciplines to discuss important questions concerning privacy and identity management and related issues in a global environment subject to change. This Summer School is not a “taught course”: it does enable, however, students to gain credit points for presenting and attending, and their paper to be considered as a candidate for a Best Paper award.

Vision of the 2018 School

The world is in the throes of a revolution of big data and machine learning, affecting many technologies and society at large. Digital data is an essential resource for economic growth, competitiveness, innovation, job creation and societal progress in general. To be exploited, data needs to flow across borders and sectors, should be smartly aggregated and processed, and should be accessible and reusable by most stakeholders. A key aspect of these developments is the harvesting, storage, processing, (re)use and commodification of (personal) data, based on the ‘datafication’ in all areas of life. There is a need to critically assess from interdisciplinary perspective what this means for the (dis)empowerment of users/citizens/consumers as (not) being in control regarding identity, security, privacy and publicness. A lot of the data collection and processing happens in an opaque way behind the scenes. In particular the role of algorithms and their impact on selection is often opaque as (commercial) platforms tend to treat them as trade secrets, not open for inspection or discussion. In that sense a big part of the reasoning and decisions behind selection is black-boxed. Given the proliferation of these type of algorithms – often based on machine learning – in many spheres of life (communication, mobility, employment, finance, etc.) scholars, policy makers and society at large is demanding more transparency, fairness and accountability regarding these selection mechanisms.

In order to safeguard public values like privacy and diversity in these systems we need to investigate how to make data processing transparent and meaningful for people and other stakeholders in society. This requires ex ante accountable and diverse algorithm design and ex post scrutinising and auditing algorithms, to mitigate and avoid negative social, ethical and economic consequences for society (e.g. discrimination, social exclusion, disinformation, inequality,…). More broadly the question is also how society and citizens can take back control of these online platforms and ‘smart’ technologies. This requires efforts for data literacy by people but also inside private and public organisations. Data literacy refers to increasing awareness, building attitudes, enhancing capabilities and adjusting behaviour among users regarding (personal) data collection, processing and (re)use in the area of online platforms and digital technologies. It extends traditional media literacy by incorporating understandings of the material conditions and technological affordances of the proprietary control of personal data.

In addition to these technological and social interventions, also legal precautions are required. The European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) provides an overarching legislative framework that answers to the concerns regarding data protection. Simultaneously, a new Directive was adopted to protect personal data processed for the purpose of criminal law enforcement. While these legislative instruments define the “principles to be respected and enforced”, not a lot is said about the way in which these principles should be deployed technically in different industrial and societal sectors. Technological advances such as the use of open data, big data, algorithms, machine learning, blockchain and sensor development in the Internet of Everything are rapidly changing the societal landscape. Questions arise about who holds what data, and where and how that data may be used.  These advances challenge the way privacy and data protection should be provided, because current national regulatory mechanisms were not devised with these new technologies and possibilities in mind. What is also clear, from discussions in the general press, media and social media, there are also huge societal, social, and ethical concerns with regard to the implications of these emerging technologies both in theory and in their practical deployment. Here, indeed, there lies a major scientific and social challenge: how to guarantee, in a homogeneous way, the preservation of privacy and other human rights in a completely heterogeneous and cross-sectoral world, without impairing the potentialities of big data, algorithms and machine learning. These questions, as well as many other current and general research issues surrounding privacy and identity management, will all be addressed by the 2018 IFIP Summer School on Privacy and Identity Management.

Further useful information

Credit Points

Students who actively participate, in particular those who present a paper, can receive a course certificate which awards 3 ECTS points at the PhD level. Students, whose papers are already at submission full length and of sufficient quality for a PhD seminar thesis can receive a course certificate which awards 6 ECTS points at the PhD level. Student attendees who do not present a paper will receive a course certificate, which awards 1.5 ECTS points at the PhD level. The certificate can state the topic of the paper contribution so as to demonstrate its relationship (or otherwise) to the student’s master or PhD thesis.

Best Student Paper Award

Every year, at the IFIP Summer School, a paper is chosen for the Best Paper Student Award. The award is made at the School, and this award success made public. Papers written solely or primarily by students and presented by a student at the Summer School are eligible for this award. If the paper is co-authored with senior researchers, the authors have to state that the main work and contributions can be clearly attributed to the student author(s). The award will be selected based on the quality of the paper and the oral presentation.



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